September 17

The Weekly Briefing: Just What the Doctor Ordered …?

SEO Copywriter Jared Townsend described Google’s new prescription for medical condition queries …

This Search Engine Land article began in February 2015, when Google first launched its medical content search. Upon launch, there were approximately 400 searchable diseases and conditions. By the time October rolls around, Google’s medical content search will exceed 900 conditions, as well as provide informative PDFs to download and print. This is great for the inquisitive public, but a little overwhelming for hypochondriacs. Either way, the new medical knowledge graph will threaten web traffic for sites like WebMD, Everyday Health, Healthline, and more. The opportunity to be featured in the knowledge graph is promising for smaller clinics and offices, but understanding how to actually get on the knowledge graph is key.

Local Search Specialist Chip Fox shared another helpful filter to use in your Google Analytics account …

There is no doubt that Google Analytics has a robust reporting dashboard, but sometimes information is not all that it seems. A recent article from International PPC shed some light on how to better understand – and differentiate – clicks (a “click” is a click on the sponsored email’s subject line) on Gmail sponsored promotions and clicks on Gmail display and PPC ads.  If you haven’t customized your Gmail Metrics on your Analytics dashboard, you will most likely see inaccurate (and, most often, less newsworthy) click, CTR, and CPC numbers. Ultimately, you want your statistics to be accurate, so making the change is useful and can help you better understand where your ads – and money – are working. Rocco Baldassarre, the article’s author, suggests continuing to use Gmail Sponsored Promotions if you want to acquire brand visibility, if you have a high conversion rate on your Gmail clicks to the website, or if your industry’s average for CPC on other ads is excessive.

SEM Specialist Andrew Vandereit talked about the importance online reviews for local businesses …

A recent report from marketing firm BrightLocal revealed that 88% of people surveyed said they referred to online reviews either “occasionally” or “regularly” when deciding if they wanted to use a new product or service. Comparably, 71% of people answered the question “occasionally” or “regularly” just three years ago. On top of that, 72% of people said that, “positive customer reviews make me trust a business more.” With this information in mind, it’s important to turn your focus onto how your business is reflected and reviewed online. Don’t just limit your scope to Google either. Yelp, Angie’s List, and other industry directories have an impact on your “star status.”