March 4

The Weekly Briefing: Google Shakes Things Up with New AdWords Format

SEM Specialist Tory Vang discussed the new AdWords format and the effect it’ll have…
Google’s AdWords format for search results has changed significantly. Now instead of seeing ads on the right hand side of search results, users will see four at the top of the search results page. The move arrives after the Internet giant recently tested a variety of different formats. Meanwhile, Barry Schwartz of Search Engine Roundtable speculated on who would win and lose due to the change – noting winners would likely include “heavy ad testers,” those with a bidding system in place, ecommerce, and ads in position four. According to Schwartz, the CTR for the fourth ad could increase anywhere between 400%-1000%.

 

SEO Copywriter Hannah Scherrer talked about the customer’s journey and the important role of marketers…
In an article appearing on Search Engine Land, SEO expert Marcus Miller examines what are known as the “moments of truth,” otherwise represented through micro moments in the customer journey. The first moment of truth (FMOT) can be represented by a variety of instances, whether it’s the customer experiencing products on the shelf for the first time, or a traveler looking up hotel reviews. Meanwhile, other moments include: The first time the customer uses the product and, finally, when the customer becomes a fan of that product. Meanwhile, the “zero moment of truth (ZMOT)” is the moment between the initial stimulus (and ad, a tweet, a blog) and the FMOT. The ZMOT’s rise comes from our nearly limitless ability to access information at a moment’s notice. It is the research that happens through a search engine, by comparison-shopping online, or consulting the recommendations of others. As marketers, Miller notes we should be there for customers throughout every step of the way.

 

Social Media Manager Kaitlin Schlick talked about the increasing popularity of a kid-friendly search engine…
A search engine that relies on a combination of Google’s “safe search” feature and human editors is gaining in popularity. Known as “Kiddle,” the platform seeks to help children find kid-centric search results. For example, typing in the search term “revolutionary war” features page 1 results with titles like “Kids History: American Revolution” and “Revolutionary War for Kids.” While it’s a great idea, Kiddle hasn’t arrived without criticism. Some well-intentioned queries are still blocked. For certain terms, the search engine is not yet advanced enough to distinguish between safe content and content that should be excluded because it’s not kid-friendly. Will it be something worth optimizing for in the future? Only time will tell.