August 22

The Weekly Briefing: What’s Behind Wikipedia’s Slide?

Copywriter Jared Townsend discussed interesting traffic changes related to Wikipedia…

Traffic to popular online encyclopedia Wikipedia is down…drastically. The news was initially reported by SimilarWeb and, according to an article from Search Engine Journal, site visits to Wikipedia fell by a whopping 11% during a period spanning from May to July of this year. So what’s behind the drop? The online SEO community has been abuzz with speculation on what may have caused it. While some have guessed a manual penalty, it’s safer to assume that Google’s ever-increasing expansion of direct answers in search results is leading fewer visitors to actually click on Wikipedia links to find the information they’re looking for. Instead, they may be satisfied simply reading the answers they’re seeing in results. Taking the following for example…

Lower search for Wikipedia

SEM Specialist Langton-Yanowitz discussed the most important ranking factors according to Moz…

SEO-focused website Moz has released its 2015 report on ranking factors, determined by questioning over one hundred specialists involved in the search marketing industry. Ranked number one and two were link features – covering domain-level links and page-level links respectively, proving that once again, the power of having quality backlinks to your site is still considered highly important. At #3 were “page-level keyword & content-based features” while page-level social metrics ranked last. Check out the full list of search ranking factors on Moz for further information.

Search Marketing Manager Dan Polhamer discussed Google’s current status in Europe…

A report from Bloomberg provided fascinating insight into anti-trust concerns over Google in Europe. The tech giant has been accused of continuously promoting its own online products and services to European searchers, costing local companies. It’s a problem that Google hasn’t faced as much back in the U.S., however – even though some similar sentiments have persisted. More specifically, the article dives into the European Union’s investigation of Google Android and a possible $6 billion fine, something that would account for 10% of Google’s annual revenue.

Copywriter Hannah Scherrer discussed how Google reads mobile websites…

According to a report from SEO Roundtable, Google Webmaster Trends Analyst John Mueller recently admitted in a G+ Hangout that his company doesn’t see all of what’s considered “lazy loaded content” on mobile websites. “Lazy loaded content” covers content that users must scroll down to see.” Meanwhile, if mobile webmasters want check all their mobile content to make sure that it’s indexed, they can check their sites with the Fetch as Google tool.